Leg bag system FAQs

With a disposable urine bag system as innovative as the Melio Self-Emptying Leg Bag System, you’re bound to have questions. If you can’t find the answer here, contact Technical Support at 800-482-2907,
8 am to 8 pm EST, Monday through Friday, or your distributor.

To learn more, click here to download the Instruction Guide.

The controller powers the built-in leg bag pump with a rechargable battery.

How long does it take to fully charge the controller battery the first-time I use it?

Charge the controller battery for a minimum of 16 hours before first use.

How long does a battery charge last?

A full battery charge can last as long as a week of typical use. However, you may want to charge the battery twice a week while you are sleeping to establish a simple routine that eliminates the risk you might forget to charge.

How long does it take to recharge the battery after use?

Recharge the battery for 8 to 16 hours – ideally, at night when it’s not being used. If the battery is fully discharged, recharge for at least 16 hours, just as you would the first time you use it.

How will I know if the controller battery charge is running low?

The green LED light on the controller flashes when the battery charge is getting low.

How often should I clean the controller?

Wipe the controller with a damp cloth as needed to keep it clean. Do not use harsh cleaning chemicals. The controller is not waterproof and should not be submerged.

What happens if the controller is damaged?

Contact Technical Support at 800-482-2907, 8 am to 8 pm EST, Monday through Friday, or your distributor. Do not attempt to open the controller; this will void the warranty. The customer service representative will provide instructions if the controller needs to be returned or replaced.

How long does the controller last?

The controller has a one-year warranty, but with careful use, should last for 3 to 5 years.

The controller alerts you when it’s time to empty your leg bag.

How do the system alerts work?

The controller can provide three alert types: (1) lights of different colors can flash or stay lit continuously, (2) the controller can vibrate, and (3) the controller can beep. You can turn the sound off for added privacy during use. It’s up to you.

When the leg bag needs to be emptied, a yellow light flashes, the controller vibrates, and a beep will sound if audio is ON. This repeats every 3 minutes until the bag is emptied.

Do I need to set the level at which the alert is triggered?

No, you don’t have to worry about it. The system is set to activate an alert when the bag is about two-thirds full.

Ask someone who uses it:

It’s an amazing product. It made me feel better and in control. Before I had all the reasons to stay home and that has really depressed me. I feel better now because I am able to live and act as a normal person.”

— 37-year-old female Melio leg bag patient

The Melio leg bag is an integrated system with a fluid sensor, pump, and tubing.

Can the Melio leg bag be attached to a night bag?

Yes. Simply attach the discharge tube to your night bag and urine will automatically drain through the Melio system and into your night bag.

Can the Melio leg bag be worn on the thigh?

Wearing the leg bag on thigh is not recommended. The fill sensor will be very inaccurate if the bag is worn on the thigh. A Melio thigh bag is currently being developed.

Can I activate the pump to empty the leg bag any time? Does it require a minimum urine volume to work?

You control the pump, and you can empty the bag any time you choose. The pump will work at very small fluid volumes.

When fitting the bag, should I wear gloves? My nurse wears them.

Gloves are not necessary for your own routine bag handling, but you may wear them if you wish. Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water before and after handling the bag and tubing to reduce the risk of infection.

How often do I need to use a brand new leg bag?

The Melio leg bag should be changed every 7 days or sooner, if recommended by your health care provider. This change time helps reduce bacteria build-up in the pump and tubing.

When I change the leg bag, can I keep tubing and connectors in case I need them in the future?

No. Wrap the whole system in paper or place it in a plastic bag and put it in the trash as you would with other household medical waste. Check with local authorities as to regulations for medical waste in your area. Tubing and connectors cannot be reused.

Must I empty the bag before putting it in the trash?

Yes, empty the bag and then dispose of the system properly.

Can the pump or any part of the unit be recycled?

Not at this time. Generally anything that has come in contact with body fluid cannot be recycled.

The pump empties the leg bag when you activate it with the controller.

What happens if the pump doesn’t work?

First, run through the troubleshooting steps in the Instructions for Use (IFU) booklet. If you can’t quickly solve the problem, you can still empty the bag by gravity. Instructions to empty the bag via gravity drainage are in the IFU.

Can I disconnect the pump from the leg bag?

No, the pump is part of the leg bag and cannot be disconnected.

Packaging

How many bags come with each pack?

Consumables Pack (Z1003 or Z1004): 2 leg bag systems

Height Inlet tube Discharge tube Inlet tube Discharge tube
Medium Under 5 ft 10 in 8 inches 4 ft 20 cm 120 cm

 

Does packaging protect my privacy?

Yes, Melio leg bags are packed in a plain brown box for home delivery.

How should I store my Melio Self-Emptying Leg Bag System before use?

Store them at room temperature away from extreme heat. Take care to avoid unauthorized access. Store in an area protected from pets or other animals.

How can I get additional leg bag straps or night bag holders?

You can order them through your local distributor, or email your request to info@MelioLegBag.com.

Service

What is the procedure for returns of faulty units?

Contact Technical Support at 800-482-2907, 8 am to 8 pm EST, Monday through Friday, or your distributor. You will receive instructions for replacing a faulty product.

Who should I contact if I have a problem with my leg bag?

If your problem or concern is medical in nature, contact your health care provider. If you have a specific question about the Melio Self-Emptying Leg Bag System, you may contact Technical Support at 800-482-2907, 8 am to 8 pm EST, Monday through Friday, or your distributor. Or email: info@MelioLegBag.com

What happens if the controller is damaged?

Contact Technical Support at 800-482-2907, 8 am to 8 pm EST, Monday through Friday, or your distributor. Do not attempt to open the controller; this will void the warranty. The customer service representative will provide instructions if the controller needs to be returned or replaced.

What happens if the pump doesn’t work?

First, run through the troubleshooting steps in the Instructions for Use (IFU) booklet. If you can’t quickly solve the problem, you can still empty the bag by gravity. Instructions to empty the bag via gravity drainage are in the IFU.

Resources

Online resource library for leg bag and catheter users

We know it can be overwhelming to search all over the Web to find reliable and useful information about urinary catheters, urine collection bags, and their care. We have compiled links here as a services to our customers, to catheter users, and others in the community who can learn from them. As with anything you read online, first follow the instructions from your health care provider (who knows your particular situation best). Then use this information to learn more and to come up with questions for that provider.

This curated list of resources links to detailed, credible information from reliable organizations whose missions are to provide sound, scientific information to health care consumers and their caregivers. While we can’t guarantee information from external sites, the organizations have proven themselves over time. We have reviewed the information on the page to which we link, which is accurate at that time. Some of the resources we use include:

  • National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), A service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.
  • National Spinal Cord Injury Association
  • Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health
  • Urology Care Foundation of the American Urological Association
  • Mayo Clinic
  • Journal of the American Medical Association
  • American Academy of Family Physicians

If we have left out a resource you’ve used and find helpful, please let us know. info@meliolegbag.com

 

Useful Links

Learning About the Urinary System

The Urinary Tract and How it Works from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Introduction to the Urinary System from the SEER Training Site, which teaches people how to keep records about patients with cancer, a part of the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health U.S.

Understanding the Urinary System from the National Spinal Cord Injury Association

Learning About Urine Laboratory Tests

Understanding Urinalysis from Lab Tests Online, a service of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry laboratory professionals

About Urinalysis from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Understanding Urine Culture from Lab Tests Online, a service of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry laboratory professionals

About Urine Culture from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

About Urine pH from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

About Urine Specific Gravity from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Learning About Urinary Function Tests

Urodynamic Testing from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Learning About Imaging the Urinary System

Imaging of the Urinary Tract from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Monitoring Your Urine

About Urine Color from the Mayo Clinic

About Bloody Urine from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

About Blood in Urine from the Mayo Clinic

Hematuria—Blood in the Urine from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

About Urine Odor from the Mayo Clinic

About Urine Odor from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

About Foamy Urine from the Mayo Clinic

About Decreased Urine Output from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Learning About Urinary Conditions

Urologic Diseases Dictionary from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Nerve Conditions and Bladder Control

Nerve Disease and Bladder Control from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S

Neurogenic Bladder from the Urology Care Foundation of the American Urological Association

Neurogenic Bladder from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Urinary Retention from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Urinary Tract Infection in Special Circumstances

Catheter-Related Urinary Tract Infection from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Urinary Tract Infection in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury from the National Spinal Cord Injury Association

Urinary System Infections

Urinary Tract Infections from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Urinary Tract Infections—Quick Read Version from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Lo que usted debe saber sobre las infecciones urinarias de la National Kidney y Enfermedades Urológicas Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), Un servicio del Instituto Nacional de Diabetes y Enfermedades Digestivas y Renales (NIDDK), los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH) de EE.UU.

Urinary Tract Infection from the Journal of the American Medical Association

Urinary Tract Infection Fact Sheet from the Office on Women’s Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Infección de las vías urinarias hoja de datos de la Oficina para la Salud del Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de los EE.UU. de la Mujer

Urinary Tract Infections from the American Academy of Family Physicians

Kidney Infection from the Mayo Clinic

Kidney Infection from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

Chronic Bladder Infection in Women from the Mayo Clinic

Learning About Urinary Drainage

About Urinary Catheters from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Urinary Drainage Bags from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Catheter Care from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Suprapubic Catheter Care from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

Research Studies

Neurogenic Urinary Bladder Research from ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, which provides patients, their family members, and the public with easy and free access to information on clinical studies for a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Urinary Tract Infections Research from ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, which provides patients, their family members, and the public with easy and free access to information on clinical studies for a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Kidney Infections Research from ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, which provides patients, their family members, and the public with easy and free access to information on clinical studies for a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Clinical Trials Relating to Urine, Miscellaneous from ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, which provides patients, their family members, and the public with easy and free access to information on clinical studies for a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Other Information Relating to the Urinary System

About Cranberries from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health U.S.

Organizations

Directory of Organizations for Kidney and Urological Disease
from the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH) U.S.

American Restroom Association Public Restroom Initiatives

American Restroom Association Public Restroom Locator Tools

American Restroom Association Web site index

European Association of Urology Nurses

Global Alliance of Urinary Nurses The Global Alliance of Urology Nurses seeks to foster a global urology nursing alliance to promote excellence, share knowledge, and set standards for quality urological nursing practice and patient education.

180 Medical, a company that specializes in intermittent catheter products, has a scholarship program to help those with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, and/or a neurogenic bladder. It was started by the company’s Founder & CEO, Todd Brown, who was injured in a motocross accident that left him with a spinal cord injury.

Financial Aid for Disabled Students (Scholarships)


 

Questions to ask

Questions to Ask About Urinary Catheters from Medline Plus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health

There’s a lot to know to care for your urinary catheter and the related equipment. Here’s a checklist of items you can use for discussion with your health care provider:

  • How to care for the catheter and drainage system
  • Where to get new catheters, drainage bags, and other supplies
  • How often should the catheter, drainage bags, and other supplies be changed or replaced
  • How to dispose of used supplies
  • Who will change the catheter? Does it require an appointment?
  • How to wash the area where the catheter enters the body
  • Are there special soaps or lotions to use to protect my skin where the straps and the catheter holder rest?
  • How much fluid to drink each day
  • Ways to avoid constipation
  • Modifications for sexual relations
  • Common problems to expect and how to manage them
  • Whether to take a probiotic when antibiotics are needed
  • Risk for autonomic dysreflexia, symptoms, and what to do
  • When to call the health care provider


 

Tips for Successful Catheter Care

Everyone finds their own tricks and tips for remembering steps of care for a urinary catheter and related equipment. Here are some things you might want to try.*

Listen Up! Your body will usually let you know if something’s wrong.

Drink More Water and think about limiting caffeine that can irritate the bladder (unless, of course, you have different instructions from your health care provider)

Drink Fluids Throughout the Day because regular intake promotes regular output

Drink Enough! An average person who weighs about 150 lbs should drink at least 68 ounces each day. Writing it down makes it easier to keep track. (Click here for a bladder diary you can download)

Color Matters when it comes to monitoring urine. It should be light yellow. If it’s darker, drink up!

Check It Out! Be sure you know where your catheter is each time you change position and make sure it is not twisted or kinked.

Help at Hand Know who to call with questions and don’t think you have to tough it out!

Bag It and move your leg bag to the inside and outside of each leg until you find a place that works best. If you can, switch legs each day to reduce pressure from the straps.

*Wilde MH et al: Perceived value of a urinary catheter self-management program in the home Home Healthcare Nurse 2013;31(9):465-473. European Association of Urology Nurses Evidence-based Guidelines for Best Practice in Urological Health Care: Catheterization: Indwelling Catheters in Adults 2012.